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Tech Roundup: Aluminum Apples, Chrome Declines, and More

Apple rumored to have new production process-- According to 9to5Mac, Appleis using a new production process in which lasers and water jets carve blocks of aluminum into cases, first for the MacBook Brick, later for -- who knows? The thought is that it would avoid bending and therefore stressing the metal, making a stronger case, and they get a strong, smooth, and cool casing for cheap. Yup, quite the rumor, but the site has called a number of Apple product intros early on, and this would be one big design and manufacturing innovation. Now, if only Apple can use the process for the iPhone, turn the whole thing into a giant antenna, and maybe actually get some decent bandwidth connections. [Source: 9to5Mac]

Google's Chrome usage on the decline -- Those who thought that Google's Chrome browser would be a category monster because of its backing should know that according to one source, at least, analytic engines are showing that use of the new software is down. You can't really get a good sense from one site's experience, even that of GigaOM, because you have a self-selecting sample. (Last I heard, IE use was significantly ahead of Firefox's.) Guess Google will have to regroup and cry all the way to its very large bank account. [Source: GigaOM]

China wants your code -- Well, China wants your code if you make hardware, at least to start. The government there is supposedly instituting a new requirement that foreign companies selling products in China will have to disclose secret information, including their code. If a company refuses, it faces seeing its product banned. Why is everyone worried? What are the Chinese going to do, use the knowledge to advance their own businesses? OK, everyone can stop laughing now. [Source: AP]

Motorola betting on Android -- Motorola is putting a strong bet on the success of Google's Android cell phone operating system by hiring an additional 300 Android developers over the 50 it already has. You'd think the company was either confident in its estimate of who would succeed in the platform wars or so desperate that it next planning to put "I Want to Believe" bumper stickers on every employee's transportation. [Source: CNET]

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