Winter Storms Breaking Records and Budgets

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Virginia has sopped dry its $79 million dollar snow-removal budget. Maryland figures this storm will put them $33 million in the red.
CBS

From Massachusetts to Arkansas, some schools didn't even wait for the first snowflake. They cancelled for the week.

In Virginia, there are still places that haven't dug out from the last storm that started on Friday, reports CBS News correspondent Sharyl Attkisson next to a snow-buried house and driveway.

This budget-sucking series of storms has brought every state in its path to its knees.

"The budget is destroyed. It is gone," said Joan Morris of the Virginia Department of Transportation.

Virginia has sopped dry its $79 million dollar snow-removal budget. Maryland figures this storm will put them $33 million in the red.

"I'm waiting for my roof to collapse. That's the next thing," said a grocery store customer.

But for the lucky few, there's an upside.

"We have sold approximately 2,000 shovels in the last week and a half," said a hardware store owner.

And there's nothing like the feeling of getting the last bag of salt.

At the grocery store, people come for milk - but only find cream.

"Ain't no need to get frustrated cause you can't do anything about it," said one customer.

And where's the beef?

"It's all gone, all gone" a customer said.

Actually, it's in the frozen section of farms - waiting to be fed.

"Just deal with it. Just deal with," one farmer told Attkisson of the threat of more snow.

With residents wondering how they can handle another foot-plus of snow, there is one bit of good news.

Forty thousand tons more salt just arrived at the Port of Baltimore.

Washington, D.C. normally only gets about 16 inches of snow in a whole year. The last two storms each surpassed that and this one might, too.